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Saturday
Jul162005

Decompression Idea

This is coming up lots and just came up again in one of my yahoogroups. This url was mentioned and when I looked, I thought, "well, here we are again!"

http://www.midwifescottage.com/

My comments:

I haven't ever seen it or this site before, thanks for sharing it.

I poked around and whomever this is charges to listen to birth stories (via email) and she deciphers things the woman doesn't understand, fills in holes, and helps her work through her experience. Via one email (I think).

I found it interesting on several fronts.

1. I have done this for free for YEARS and only very recently thought about charging. This woman charges $75 and responds within a week, then shreds the email (deletes). She then charges $25 if she is able to USE the story, identifying factors removed. Clever!

2. Is this therapy? Is there a way that perhaps this might be a replacement for someone getting help? When I talk with women, I am clear about my thoughts on the therapy front. Perhaps it wouldn't be a bad way for a woman to hear her own story and hear that she might want more help than an on-line midwife can offer.

3. I have been honing a service that I'm trying to find a name for. Something along the lines of a decompression session, but mixed with a mini-course in how to do cord care, nurse lying down, swaddle, a reality check on the normalcy of crying, etc.

4. As an added service that I already do charge for ($100), I go do newborn screens (PKUs) even on babies that weren't of my clients I've done that twice in the last couple of weeks. The state charges for the screen, too, so the client has to also supply me with an $83 check to pay for it. I am still trying to figure out which insurances will pay for NBS and which won't.

5. I get women's charts for them (and do not mind AT ALL!), but perhaps charging to decipher them for them via phone calls or emails is appropriate?

Perhaps I would be able to offer the service to others out on the Net that I don't regularly interact with. The average I spend with a first time decompression via phone with strangers is 90 minutes. The average time with an in-person decompression session is 2-2.5 hours. The NBS takes about 45 minutes (I don't just run in, poke, and run out... that wouldn't be right.)

I think that what I offer is different than a typical postpartum doula - tons of experience as midwife and doula who knows all birth settings very well and mother of 4 kids.

I feel like I am trying to sell myself (or you!) on it. The more I flesh it out, the more I like the idea.

Now, for a name.

Thanks for listening and any thoughts or input is appreciated.

(And I do understand that not everyone has money and deserves assistance/decompression, too. I give away 90% of my midwifery services, so can only imagine this would be the same.)

end of thoughts in that post, but surely not the end of figuring things out

Reader Comments (4)

Do you know Birthing From Within has an really, really revolutionary approach to healing birth wounds?
Personally something I have been wanting to provide for years (took the training years ago)...It's quite remarkable.

Regardless, I don't know about charging for looking at records - especially since it may mean getting a client down the road...to me, helping deciper that is just par for the course. Just me though...money, money, money - it's a hard issue for me.

keep brainstorming!

Lesley - in santa cruz

July 17, 2005 | Unregistered CommenterAnonymous

I understand what you are saying, Lesley... what I meant about the chart thing is that I can spend over an hour with the woman explaining what stuff is... and it turns, almost always, into that decompression session. Women who adored their birth experiences don't typically ask for their charts, right?

And I have done this for women as far away as Ireland! So they aren't all (probably not even the majority) potential clients.

And I know. Money is such a difficult thing. One of my annoyances with Sarah is always the "how much will you be paid" that comes with every new thing I want to do/offer. I do understand in many ways because she is the one funding my book buying, clothes wearing, midwifery supply getting life and all, but I have to wean into this part of it. It's hard for me to ask for money! But, I'm practicing.

And many of the women around me can afford it. Those that can't, I would never turn away. And no one likes to talk about it, but I want to value my time as much as if I were a mechanic taking a look under the hood, poking around, testing the battery, etc.

I certainly don't want to seem greedy. Not by any stretch of the imagination. The booklet I did? I think I've sold maybe 10? I keep giving them away! As if I were writing articles on the Net (which they are/were) and it didn't cost Sarah a lot of money to get printed.

*sigh*

It's a hard issue for me, too. Good to explore though, eh?

July 17, 2005 | Unregistered CommenterNavelgazing Midwife

Oh! and we teach Birthing From Within at the office and I love it. My co-teacher is a BFW Mentor and we combine the class with Hypnobirthing (she is certified to do that, too) and it makes for a really unique class that women say they enjoy a lot.

And I sell it at Ama Mama, too. Great resource!

July 17, 2005 | Unregistered CommenterNavelgazing Midwife

I totally get what you are saying. Maybe it's just me - I keep seeing midwives trying to make money off of every single thing. And it's becomming more and more about BUSINESS...
Makes me feel sad.
There's a balance, I know.

BFW has a very specific training for workshops on healing birth wounds...it's quite remarkable and different from thier classes. Did you know about that?

Wishing you lots joyous births!

July 18, 2005 | Unregistered CommenterAnonymous

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