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Saturday
Dec182010

Don't Ask, Don't Tell REPEALED!

It's such a momentous day... our family is celebrating as if it were New Year's Eve!

Remember that my spouse Sarah was in the US Army from 1983-1990 and was kicked out for being Lesbian despite garnering many awards and accolades for her superior work and work ethic. Sarah would have been an amazing career Army soldier; our country lost out immensely by the stupid rule... which, at that time was "Gay? Out you go. And take this Dishonorable Discharge with you." She negotiated an Honorable Discharge with a bar to re-enlistment.

The Army called Sarah when the first Gulf War broke out, telling her they needed her MOS (her specialty... a mechanic for diesel trucks 22.5 tons and bigger) critically for the war. She told them "If this dyke isn't good enough for you in peace time, she sure isn't good enough for you in war time. Go find some straight chick to carry those 50-pound tool boxes."

We are ecstatic. Absolutely giddy with joy!

Reader Comments (8)

Hooray! We've been working and waiting a long time for this! What an awesome day to celebrate!

December 18, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterRobin Gray-Reed

I am so glad this got repealed. Every citizen has a right to protect our freedoms regardless of sexual preference. I think I read somewhere that other countries who have LGBT service personnel don't have any issues within the corps that (Homophobic) U.S legislators feared would occur. It just goes to show how emotions and unfounded fear play more into politics than reason.
Secondly, I am amused that they called Sara back. My dad was in the Marines and attempted to get promoted. But because he was passed over three times they disharged him. Then, during the Gulf War same thing they called my father saying they made a mistake and would he come back. It's ridiculous. You're right. If they didn't appreciate your hard work and commitment before then why all of a sudden do they need you when times get tough?

December 18, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterKatherine

Small nitpick. It isn't a "sexual preference"... it's sexual orientation. While I *do* prefer women, the only "choice" in the matter is whether to listen to my innate drive in this (oftentimes) stupid culture or not.

Crazy about your dad, too!

December 18, 2010 | Registered CommenterNavelgazing Midwife

Re your nitpick: sorry! I didn't say it as eloquently as I had wanted to! Thanks for the better choice of words! :-)

December 18, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterKatherine

Congratulations! This is so, so long overdue. (And I, too, cannot believe they tried to bring Sarah back.) I've seen several analysts say (and I think I agree) that this will help move marriage equality forward. How bad will it look when the partners of decorated veterans can't get benefits?

December 18, 2010 | Unregistered Commenterchingona

What sort of safeguards will put in place to protect gay soldiers from discrimination?

The military has a very poor record of anti-discrimination policies. Sexual assault of female soldiers is very high. I imagine it will be worse for openly gay soldiers (at least some of them). What's to stop a commanding officer from weeding out all the gay soldiers and just kicking them out, now they are allowed to "ask."?

December 19, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterMeghan

Frequent reader of your blog and current Army staff sergeant. I have always bitched and complained about this stupid policy. So glad it's gone!!

December 20, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterDanielle

I'm giving my unit mandatory DADT repeal training next week. It's not very often I'm so happy about having to do mandatory training for everyone! YEAH!

April 14, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterKate

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